I & R16 Myths & Facts13 (story) Loading...12 Fayen d'Evie12 Video11 Text10 Crisis10 Reproductions9 Sound8 Improvements8 Favourable Conditions7 Poetry7 Photography7 Listening7 Memory7 Environment6 Sculpture6 Performing the Archive6 Points of Connection6 a border can have no boundaries6 Painting5 Installation5 Casual-Paradise5 Sincerely Yours5 to listen, not to preserve5 Fandom5 Archives4 Language4 writing4 Artist Walks3 Augury – The diary of birds3 Pandemic3 Record3 Performance3 Labour3 WS × Social Studio2 Precarity2 Gentrification2 Textile2 music2 Community2 read2 fiction2 Essay2 interview2 Paradise2 listen2 vampires1 spoken word1 dust1 Angna Mein1 The Region1 exhibition1 Anna Dunnill | Processing Plant1 Translation1 movement1 documentation1 Sex1 scores1 Productivity1 Politics1 Improvisation1 augury1 interpretation1 choreography1 Description1

to listen, not to preserve was a day-long program at Pipemaker’s Park, along the Maribyrnong River on unceded Wurundjeri and Boon-Wurrung Country. It was Co-curated by Isabella Hone-Saunders and Sebastian Henry-Jones, and co-presented by West Space and Melbourne’s Living Museum of the West and with support from the Maribyrnong City Council and Create NSW.

 With installations, appearances, images, a shared meal and language from Akil Ahamat, Virginia Barratt, Archie Barry, Kevin Diallo, Debris Facility Pty Ltd., Jesse Gall, Snack Syndicate and the Filipino Chaplaincy Choir, Melbourne. 

The project unfolded in recognition that today, being present and identifiable has become a double-edged sword, in an age where Capital itself is predicated on legibility. While there is a call for more equal representation in our institutions and official histories, historically vulnerable groups and individuals are also wishing to avoid the capture of their information within biometrics-driven processes that seek to extract profit through identification. 

to listen, not to preserve considered these logics within the dynamics of presentation and display that constitute ’the arts’. This day-long program places the practices of early, mid and advanced career artists in dialogue with the archive and history of Melbourne’s Living Museum of The West, to consider different ways and positions from which storytelling may evade the impulse to make empirical sense and order of our lives. These engagements celebrated ephemerality, fiction, imagination and mutability, all the while considering the liveability of their influence on individuals searching for the conditions of togetherness within opacity. 

Beautiful photographs and documentation by Kenneth Suico and Sharni Hodge

Guests reading Snack Syndicate's 'Triangle Fold'
Guests reading Snack Syndicate's 'Triangle Fold'
Guests reading Snack Syndicate's 'Triangle Fold'
Akil Ahamat, 'The birds always sing before the light', 2022
Akil Ahamat, 'The birds always sing before the light', 2022
Akil Ahamat, 'The birds always sing before the light', 2022
Akil Ahamat, 'The birds always sing before the light', 2022
Debris Facility Pty. Ltd., 'LIQUIDATION: DEBT REHEARSALL', 2022
Debris Facility Pty. Ltd., 'LIQUIDATION: DEBT REHEARSALL', 2022
Debris Facility Pty. Ltd., 'LIQUIDATION: DEBT REHEARSALL', 2022 (detail).
Debris Facility Pty. Ltd., 'LIQUIDATION: DEBT REHEARSALL', 2022, (detail).
Kevin Diallo, 'What used to be', 2022
Kevin Diallo, 'What used to be', 2022
Virginia Barratt, 'Djubak (white orchid), 2022
Virginia Barratt, 'Djubak (white orchid), 2022
Virginia Barratt, 'Djubak (white orchid), 2022
The Filipino Chaplaincy Choir of Melbourne
Virginia Barratt, 'Tell me what you see outside...', 2020. Text: 'In Their Interior' (Francesca da Rimini and Virginia Barratt). Video, Sound: Virginia Barratt